Contractor Tips Blog

Jan
23

Roof Valley Flashing Matters

Posted in Roofing

When it comes to roof quality, valley flashing is one of the secrets of a durable, long-lasting roofs, yet many homeowners do not even know what it is. When your roof has different parts that meet for various peaks and parts of the home, the joints are referred to as valleys. These concave areas attract moisture and are the most likely to be saturated during rain and snow. Valley flashing is the material used to seal these joints and protect your roof and home, making it a very important element.

Valley flashing is usually made from metal and is needed to secure the joints on your roof and protect them from leaks. Once the roofing material is put on, you cannot see the valley flashing, but it needs to be there performing its job. Unfortunately, if not installed correctly or if it becomes worn or corroded, it can lead to a major problem with your roof. 

Problems with Valley Flashing

If installed correctly, your valley flashing should last with your roofing and protect your home from leaks. However, there are some poor flashing practices that can create issues with your roof valleys. These can include:

  • Not extending the flashing beyond the eaves
  • Using metal that is corrosive
  • Putting holes in the center of the valley for fasteners

Even if your roof looks great, if the flashing underneath is not high quality, you could have expensive damage occur to your home when heavy rain or snow hits. Valley flashing matters, so it is important to discuss the type of flashing that will be used when you have a new roof installed. Choose a quality roofing contractor and make sure to talk about the valley flashing that will be installed with your roof.

Posted on behalf of:
Atwood Home Builders
227 W 8th Ave
Homestead, PA 15120
(412) 638-1262

Sep
10

Has Your Roof Suffered Hail Damage?

Hail is a natural enemy of homeowners, especially when it comes to the roof of their home. Hail storms can leave a roof permanently damaged, to the point where it needs complete replacement. One of the most pressing issues related to hail damage is that it may not be apparent to a homeowner right after the storm, possibly not causing any leaks or problems for months, or even years. However, if the damage is not reported soon after a storm hits, many times insurance companies may refuse to pay for hail damage to a roof later down the road. 

Importance Of Roof Inspections For Hail Damage

To protect yourself from losing a battle against your insurance company for roof hail damage, it’s important to inspect your roof after any hail storm. If damage did occur, yet a claim is not submitted until later, it may be difficult to prove the damage can be attributed to a storm, rather than normal wear and tear. After a hail storm, you should inspect your roof for: 

  • Dents in your shingles
  • Loss of asphalt granules on shingles
  • Lifted shingles
  • Loose shingles 

If you are not sure if there is hail damage to your roof, or if you are unable to inspect it safely yourself, it is best to call an experienced roofing contractor. They can properly inspect your roof, often noticing damage the typical homeowner may not detect. If there is damage, a reputable roofing company can help you file a claim with your insurance company and ensure that the insurance company has all the information needed to process your claim to have your roof repaired or replaced.

Posted on behalf of Atwood Home Builders

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